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Not a Christian nation?

June 25, 2008

Baruch Hussein Obama says this is no longer a Christian nation. The surveys disprove this. Most surprising to me is the number of people who identify themselves with beliefs like Deism, Scientology, and Eckankar, which says it will help you experience the “light and sound of God.” There are about as many Buddhists in the USA as there are Muslims…funny how the Buddhists never get any media attention. “Today, radical Buddhists…”

I think it was Robert A. Heinlein who defined an agnostic as someone who doesn’t know Who is cranking, but is glad He doesn’t stop.

Is there anything Obama says that is true? Why do so many people continue to believe this man’s lies? How can this go on without the little boy telling us the Emperor has no clothes?

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2 comments

  1. The “…government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion…”, according to Article 11 of the Treaty of Peace and Friendship, signed at Tripoli on November 4, 1796, and passed by the United States Congress.

    Article VI, Clause 2 of the U.S.A. Constitution states: “This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land…”.


  2. David – true enough, if a bit convoluted, using a treaty to define it. Different definition of “Christian nation.”

    If I recall my history correctly, the Tripoli treaty was signed to reduce, if not eliminate, piracy of American vessels operating in the Mediterranean. It didn’t work. Hence, the Barbary Coast Wars or Tripolitan Wars. A good history of that time period and the situation can be found in “Six Frigates,” by Ian Toll. It’s a great history of the first six frigates in the US Navy, but also a good study of the early days of the US as a nation. This is the time period of the “shores of Tripoli” of the Marines’ Hymn.

    I confess I’ve not read the treaty. However, my take is that the fledgling US was trying to forge a “diplomatic solution” to the piracy issues – this also involved bribery, by the way – and was willing to make such a statement to appease the Islamic states of North Africa, which were nominally part of the Ottoman Empire. Once they found that didn’t work they did try a military solution, which also didn’t work really well for them. (“Payments in ransom and tribute to the privateering states amounted to 20 percent of United States government annual revenues in 1800.” – “First Barbary War,” Wikipedia article.)

    The War of 1812 gave the US bigger problems, and it wasn’t until 1815, with the Second Barbary War, that the US was able to decisively end the piracy by the Barbary Pirates. This was one of the engagements that made Stephen Decatur one of the first heroes of the US Navy.

    As I said, I don’t know the details of the treaty you mention. However, the failed strategy of negotiating with and bribing Muslim pirates to keep them from attacking US civilians should be instructive to us today.

    And, of course, that wasn’t really what I was talking about. I meant that the US is really a country made up of people who are predominantly Christian, and who were from the time of the country’s founding. The idea that this nation is not based on Christian ideals has been discussed time and time again, and can continue to be. Still, Democrats love to cite demographics when it suits them, and in this case, Obama is incorrect…the US is a nation in which the majority of its citizens declare they are Christians. This influences our outlook as citizens as surely as Islam influences the outlook of citizens of Saudi Arabia or Syria.



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